Land Art Generator Initiative Lecture 2-19


Elizabeth Monoian & Robert Ferry, Co-founders of LAGI. Photo by Joanna Totolici,  TOTOLICI.COM

Excited to share that artist Elizabeth Monoian & architect Robert Ferry, co-founders of Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) are giving a public lecture at 5pm in the atrium of Building 7 on Friday 2/19 at Cal Poly Pomona.

Prior to the lecture, they will be guests in my LA302L & LA402L studios that are designing entries for the 2016 LAGI competition (entry deadline is May 15th), set adjacent to the Santa Monica Pier.

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Site visit with LA302L & LA402L

LAGI 2016 is an ideas competition to design a site-specific public artwork that, in addition to its conceptual beauty, has the ability to harness energy cleanly from nature and convert it into electricity and/or drinking water for the City [of Santa Monica].


The lecture is being co-sponsored by the Cal Poly Pomona Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects.


LAX Interstitial

LA301L Fall 2015 Topic Studio

Source: Wikipedia

As the gateway to the metropolis, LAX is a 3,425-acre void in the urban fabric. This studio will explore opportunities to address contemporary urban and ecological issues in the vast interstitial zones between the aviation and logistics hardscapes.

Projects in this 301L.02 will explore mapping landscape systems, visual variables and pattern generation, and use/event theory to support the final project.

Course Goals

Upon successful completion of this studio, students will gain the following design frameworks and methods:

  • Graphically evaluate ecological & technical systems in the landscape, documenting their processes, flows, nodes, topologies and spatial arrangement, boundaries and limits, and interactions with other system.
  • Express landscape systems as integral design features.
  • Use visual variables in the quantitative mapping of landscape systems and in the design graphics.
  • Generate pattern-based design framework that respond to the context and supports specific design goals or parameters (such as noise reduction).
  • Develop site-specific programming supported by the designed features, materials & plants, spaces, surfaces, and systems.
  • Refined ability to construct a clear
  • Integrate design fundamentals into the development & presentation of landscape design project.

Continue reading

Recharge City

My entry for the Dry Futures Competition in the Pragmatic category.

Recharge_City_Page_12 400

Recharge City evaluates pragmatic options for recharging the groundwater in Los Angeles County by recycling the 502 million gallons of water that is dumped by Hyperion Treatment Plant and the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant into the Pacific each day. This is enough water to quench the thirst of 5 1/2 million people.

To identify plausible sites for recharge, this project undertook a holistic mapping of the water infrastructure for the metropolis – ultimately collecting data from over 50 local, state, and federal agencies.

Recycling water is a necessity for Southern California to survive, so how can this massive infrastructure project to close the water loop create a better city for us to live in?

RechargeCity_entry [22mb rasterized pdf]

Recharge City Submission_flat-optimized [35mb pdf]

After the Aqueduct in the news!

It’s been a very busy fall and winter above and beyond my usual teaching load at Cal Poly Pomona. Just got back from presenting at #CELA2015 on DisplayScapes and organizing a panel on DIY sensing in Landscape Architecture design studios (with Lucia Phinney, Allison Lassiter, and Brad Cantrell) this past week, and creating a new 200 square feet sequence of Aqueduct Futures maps and drawings. These are on display at After the Aqueduct (curated by Kim Stringfellow) at Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions through April 12, 2015. Excited to share some of the press (LATimes, KCET, and LAM) coverage of the exhibit!

Christopher Knight reviews After the Aqueduct in the LA TImes:

A detail of Peter Bo Rappmund’s “Psychohydrography” video (2010). (Christopher Knight / Los Angeles Times)

California is not in danger of running out of water in the next year or two, but the climate-change situation is going from bad to worse as we enter the fourth year of drought. At Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions, “After the Aqueduct” looks at one big piece of the state’s water puzzle.

Organized by artist Kim Stringfellow, the show includes works by half a dozen artists and designers that focus on the century-old hydraulic water conveyance system meandering more than 200 miles from the Sierra Nevada to Southern California.

Much of the display is documentary, such as a series of charts produced by Barry Lehrman and Cal Poly Pomona students – to date, more than 120 of them – who are mapping complicated land-use issues for the school’s Aqueduct Futures program. I would describe the charts as visually dry, although the pun threatens to distract from the seriousness of the task. Continue reading

AF video introduction

Aqueduct Futures intro Video on Vimeo

Cal Poly Pomona Landscape Architecture students with Prof. Barry Lehrman and Jonathan Linkus (exhibit co-designer) share how the Aqueduct Futures Project has changed their attitudes towards water and came to understand the impact of the Los Angeles Aqueduct to all of California.

In order of appearance:

  • Barry Lehrman – project director
  • Jonathan Linkus – exhibit co-designer
  • Ernest Little
  • Ernesto Perez
  • Anais Placido
  • Alejandro Castellon
  • Anthony Vazquez Perez
  • Gabrielle Fladd
  • Christian Vasquez

Produced and Directed by:

  • Barry Lehrman

Videographer and editor:


  • Students in LA499 Spring 2013

This video is under a Creative Commons license: attribute & share alike. All other rights reserved.