mapping the h20 energy nexus

Honored to be able to contribute several illustrations to the 2016 Land Art Generator Initiative book and excited to share them on my blog.

LAGI SoCAL H20 Cycle v4 FLAT

Historic Power Lines FLAT

LAGI LA aqueductsheds FLAT v4

LAGI LA Energysheds FLAT
Click for sources   Continue reading

Advertisements

AF Exhibit

Image

Exhibit Flyer

Days from the printer’s deadline for completing the exhibit and everything is coming together with the help of Jonathan Linkus and our great closing team of research assistants (Jane, Ernesto, & Kevin).

One change worth noting is is the public reception has been shifted to Tuesday, December 3rd, 9am-11am!

Looking forward to seeing you there!

US Wildfires 2012

Map of the day

Fires across the United States, and their relative intensity, from 2001 through July 9, 2012.
CREDIT: John Nelson, IDV Solutions.

Dazzling Map Reveals Rising Menace of US Fires ǀ Wildfires 2012 | OurAmazingPlanet.com

The data, provided by two NASA satellites, were “about two mouse clicks away,” said John Nelson, the map’s maker, and the user experience and mapping manager for IDV Solutions, a Lansing, Mich., data-visualization company.

Nelson also created a map of 100 years of earthquakes:

Earthquakes since 1898

Sources:

Wildfires 2012 | OurAmazingPlanet.com.

and Earthquake Map

Climate Change Map of the Day – Heat Wave 2012

As 56% of the lower 48 are in a drought, we have an epic heatwave!

The 8 Worst Things About Summer in American Cities - Neighborhoods - The Atlantic Cities

This image released on July 3, 2012, shows the average maximum temperature forecast from July 3-7. Black signifies a temperature of 90 degrees Fahrenheit, bright orange signifies 109 F.

CREDIT: NOAA National Weather Service Hydrometeorological Prediction Center [I can’t find the original, just this attribution..]

The silver lining of the drought this year is the potentially smaller Gulf Dead Zone due to reduced runoff laden excess fertilizer with from the corn belt. (via grist.com)

Map via:

The 8 Worst Things About Summer in American Cities – Neighborhoods – The Atlantic Cities.

Also spotted on:

http://www.ouramazingplanet.com/3148-how-long-will-heat-last.html

www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/07/06/when-will-the-heat-end-us-heat-wave_n_1654817.html

 

Now Urbanism

The Chronicle for Higher Education looks at Ecological Urbanism from a weird perspective, and written by Jon Christensen, who recently appeared at the Now Urbanism project at the University of Washington (which gets mentioned at the end of the article).

[W]e ought to be teaching a new generation of students how to balance multiple objectives to increase sustainability from the city core out to the wilderness, along what Andrés Duany calls “the transect.” All along this transect, trade-offs must be made between people and nature. But in our own canvas of urban-planning programs at American universities, we found relatively few programs that offer an explicit and sustained focus on ecology and conservation science. And few programs in ecology and conservation offer any in-depth exposure to urban planning. Integrated programs that teach students both urban and conservation-planning principles will be key to overcoming this deficiency. Moreover, other disciplines should be brought into this vital conversation.

Guess they didn’t bother asking me about what I’m doing at Cal Poly Pomona, or my former colleagues at the University of Minnesota… [But I do take exception for the empty shout-out to Duany – he certainly isn’t the only person with an idea of how cities meld into the rural landscape.]

Gigapan Earth

An educator named James Drake obtained over 350 full-resolution photos from the NTs OMZ (Russian Research Center for Earth Operative Monitoring), and used them to make several videos showcasing a day in the life of Earth. The satellite takes a full image of Earth from its stationary point over 35,000 kilometers above the Indian Ocean every 30 minutes, providing the material for the video below. The images have a resolution of one kilometer per pixel, and the one you see above was taken on May 14, 2011

gigapan.com  via SFGate